cats

The question has been coming up a lot, with Jessica Pierce's recent book, Run Spot Run (an EXCELLENT, thought-provoking read); and with scientists recently looking for even MORE non-domesticated species we can keep as pets (seems ill-advised to me, even if wallabies are incredibly cute).

My Thumbnail

I recently spoke with Melissa Dahl at New York Magazine about ways to help keep our cats happy - my favorite ways: interactive play and food puzzles. You can read the story here!

My Thumbnail

 

6 Comments

kpc profile may 2014001 copy 2As promised, today’s blog post is an interview with Dr. Kris Chandroo. Kris is a practicing veterinarian, scientist, photographer, and feline welfare advocate! (=awesome). Kris also runs an amaze-balls website, I Will Help Your Cat, and he recently released his new educational program, called Stress to Success (STS), which teaches you how an understanding of your cat’s behavior can guide medical treatment. It’s a detailed course, which includes 17 beautifully filmed videos, handouts, and the information you need to increase the likelihood that you can medicate your cat! This is truly a labor of love and well worth the affordable price. Kris and I had a chat recently about cats and STS, and I’m happy to share the results with you today!

...continue reading

Few things are more rewarding than ushering our beloved pets into their senior years, helping them experience senescence with grace, comfort, and plenty of love. Unfortunately, few things also cause such anxiety (both financial and emotional). An elderly pet is more likely to have multiple medical issues, as they experience the “old-age” diseases that are more common with a longer life span – such as kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, heart disease, and cancer.

Successful treatment or management of these illness is dependent on a few things – first, the pet owner’s awareness of the problem; second, their willingness to treat the condition. As someone who works routinely with pet owners in my capacity as a cat behavior consultant, I am often surprised at how poorly many cat owners perform on both fronts.

Photo by David Martyn Hunt, via Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidchief/5912515514
Photo by David Martyn Hunt, via Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidchief/5912515514

Cats are experts at hiding pain, but I’ve seen situations where cat owners didn’t seem to think much of a limp, a tooth that was falling out, or sudden changes in their cat’s behavior that suggested pain or discomfort. In some cases, this was due to a lack of attention, or the owner’s lack of comfort with examining all parts of their cat’s body. In other cases, I think it was a case of pretending the problem didn’t exist. In most cases, when I brought up a vet exam, I could see the dread growing across the human’s face…the stress of getting their cat into a carrier, the pathetic meowing during the car ride, the perception of the cat as “difficult” during the vet visit, the mounting veterinary bills that would likely result. Often owners cite their own distaste for going to the doctor as a good reason not to bring a sick cat to the veterinarian. And of course many owners don’t even bring their cats for a yearly preventative physical, which is a great way to catch and treat some of those medical conditions before they become bigger problems.

...continue reading

If you want to learn a lot about yourself, try training another animal. 

I'm revisiting this post in honor of the #Train4Rewards blog party, brought to you by Companion Animal Psychology, a fine fine blog from Zazie Todd! I wrote this post over two years ago about training my cat...well, I'll let you just read it! (Not to spoil the ending, but we were eventually successful in the training!)

Thank you Zazie for the blog party!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I’ve skated through life without having to do a lot of animal training --- even as someone who studies animals! I grew up with untrained cats; the research lab I worked in as an undergraduate used key-pecking in pigeons to study their behavior (something pigeons basically learn on their own through a process called autoshaping); I currently study food-storing in squirrels --- something they are experts at. I like studying what animals do naturally --- and now I think I know why.

Pigeons being autoshaped to peck a key in an operant chamber.

bloghifiveI have trained my cats to do cute parlor tricks – high-five, sit, and the like. But, most of the important stuff that my cats know, they have figured out on their own, such as using the litterbox (no help from me), and using their scratching post (encouraged with positive reinforcement). But I’ll be honest, I don’t really LOVE training. I enjoy the parlor tricks, and I think my cats do too, but that’s a low stakes situation. Now I would like to train one of my cats to perform a new behavior – to go through a cat door into a magical box that will prevent my other cat from eating all of her food (more on the Meowspace in a future blog!).

...continue reading

3 Comments

corenApparently there is nothing more offensive to the pet-loving masses than suggesting that pets might not love everything we do. Stanley Coren, a psychologist who has been very active in studying the human-animal bond, recently presented his observations that when analyzing randomly selected photos of humans hugging their dogs, over 80% of the dogs appeared to be exhibiting behavioral signs of stress (to be clear, some dogs seemed perfectly happy with the hugs, just not too many of them). Now, this was not a peer-reviewed study, but let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater just yet. ...continue reading

1 Comment

In the early 1900s, scientific attention to animal cognition was focused on the performance of one animal, Clever Hans the horse. His owner, a mathematics teacher, claimed that Hans could perform addition, subtraction, multiplication and work with fractions. Indeed, Hans could answer questions correctly even if his owner was not present, which led an investigative panel to conclude that this was not a case of fraud (NYTimes, 1904; Pfungst, 1911). Several months later a psychologist was able to determine that Hans could not do mathematics, but instead was sensitive to human cues of correct answers (Allen & Bekoff, 1999; Pfungst, 1911). This planted a seed of doubt in psychological explorations of the numerical abilities of non-human animals; however, these doubts have since been challenged again and again! It is clear that while non-human animals’ cognitive abilities are clearly different than those of humans, these differences, to quote Darwin, are “of degree and not of kind."

Numeracy is the broad range of numerical applications used by humans and other animals. At its most basic level, numeracy is expressed in the ability to discriminate between the size, amount or other aspects of quantity of different objects (Devlin, 2000). Quantity discrimination has been studied in animals from fish to birds to primates, and most animals show some level of it. Many studies of numeracy have been done on carnivores, with canines overly represented. It’s time to give the kitties some scientific attention. An amount that they can detect. ...continue reading

4 Comments

If not, now is the perfect time to learn more!

I've joined forces with my dear friend and fellow cat consultant, Ingrid Johnson of Fundamentally Feline to bring you a new web resource: Food Puzzles for Cats!

My Thumbnail

We show you how to get started - or how to keep challenging your cat if you already use food puzzles with your cat! We'll be describing and reviewing different types food puzzles and giving you links to DIY projects and videos about food puzzles!

We'll also be on Facebook and Twitter...check us out!

2 Comments

I'm finally realizing how busy getting a PhD makes you! I'm wrapping up a semi-failed experiment and I'm also about to head to the East Coast for a few days of fun and work in Atlanta, and then off to Melbourne, Florida for the Comparative Cognition Society Conference where I'll be giving a short talk on some of my squirrel research.

But I haven't been too busy to chat with folks about my favorite thing...cats.

wapoI was ABSOLUTELY thrilled to talk with Sadie Dingfelder at the Washington Post about her experience clicker training her cat to sit on her lap. Was the loving response fake because she gave him treats for being loving? NO! I don't know why humans get so hung up on "bribing" cats to do things when we "bribe" humans to do things we want all the time! Alexandra Horowitz also weighs in, just in case you thought dogs were not bribe-able. And why do people treat reinforcing behavior you like as if it were a bad thing?

For the record, I love dark chocolate, especially the Alter Eco Quinoa bar.

tailspetDo you love cat videos? Me too, as long as there are no scary cucumbers. I spoke with Laura Drucker at Tails Pet Magazine about why we love cat videos.

 

 

 

atlasI also spoke with Dan Nosowitz at Atlas Obscura not too long ago about how to talk to your cat (last year I spoke to him about whether squirrels are smart). Some great quotes from my favorite cat scientist, John Bradshaw, as well!