Tag Archives: Kris Chandroo

I was recently interviewed by Ingrid King for the Conscious Cat website! I shared how I became a cat behavior specialist, and discussed my approach to helping folks, as well as sharing the gory details about some of my favorite and most challenging cat behavior cases!

I was lucky to meet Ingrid at AAFP in DC last year and we also hung out recently in NYC at Cat Camp, and I thought her website would be a great opportunity to help folks better understand their cats!

Sooooo, following in my friend Kris Chandroo's footsteps (he's doing an "Ask the Vet" column at Conscious Cat -- hey, it's a small cat world, turns out we all know each other), I will be answering reader questions over at consciouscat.net. I hope to get the kitty-knowledge to the people once a month or so! Check out my first batch of answers here.

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I'm looking forward to this weekend's IAABC conference, featuring presentations on cat, dog, horse and parrot behavior from Susan Friedman, Christopher Pachel, Lore Haug, Kristyn Shreve, Trish McMillan Loehr, Michael Shikashio, and more. Oh, and ME!

I'll be presenting some of my favorite cat behavior case studies, looking at how different factors influenced recommendations and behavioral outcomes for cats and their families! It's not too late to register!!!

If you are in Los Angeles, I hope to see you there 🙂

If you can't be there, don't feel left out, I hope to do a better job live-tweeting than I did at Cat Con!

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This week, Ingrid King was kind enough to interview me for her blog/website the Conscious Cat! I tell all about my personal path to a career in cat behavior consulting and the rewards and challenges it brings!!

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I also helped out my friend Kris Chandroo (who I featured on my blog last year) by answering some behavior questions for his "Ask the Vet" column at the Conscious Cat earlier this week. Look for MORE answers from me to MORE behavior questions at Ingrid's site in the near future!!

 

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kpc profile may 2014001 copy 2As promised, today’s blog post is an interview with Dr. Kris Chandroo. Kris is a practicing veterinarian, scientist, photographer, and feline welfare advocate! (=awesome). Kris also runs an amaze-balls website, I Will Help Your Cat, and he recently released his new educational program, called Stress to Success (STS), which teaches you how an understanding of your cat’s behavior can guide medical treatment. It’s a detailed course, which includes 17 beautifully filmed videos, handouts, and the information you need to increase the likelihood that you can medicate your cat! This is truly a labor of love and well worth the affordable price. Kris and I had a chat recently about cats and STS, and I’m happy to share the results with you today!

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Few things are more rewarding than ushering our beloved pets into their senior years, helping them experience senescence with grace, comfort, and plenty of love. Unfortunately, few things also cause such anxiety (both financial and emotional). An elderly pet is more likely to have multiple medical issues, as they experience the “old-age” diseases that are more common with a longer life span – such as kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, heart disease, and cancer.

Successful treatment or management of these illness is dependent on a few things – first, the pet owner’s awareness of the problem; second, their willingness to treat the condition. As someone who works routinely with pet owners in my capacity as a cat behavior consultant, I am often surprised at how poorly many cat owners perform on both fronts.

Photo by David Martyn Hunt, via Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidchief/5912515514
Photo by David Martyn Hunt, via Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidchief/5912515514

Cats are experts at hiding pain, but I’ve seen situations where cat owners didn’t seem to think much of a limp, a tooth that was falling out, or sudden changes in their cat’s behavior that suggested pain or discomfort. In some cases, this was due to a lack of attention, or the owner’s lack of comfort with examining all parts of their cat’s body. In other cases, I think it was a case of pretending the problem didn’t exist. In most cases, when I brought up a vet exam, I could see the dread growing across the human’s face…the stress of getting their cat into a carrier, the pathetic meowing during the car ride, the perception of the cat as “difficult” during the vet visit, the mounting veterinary bills that would likely result. Often owners cite their own distaste for going to the doctor as a good reason not to bring a sick cat to the veterinarian. And of course many owners don’t even bring their cats for a yearly preventative physical, which is a great way to catch and treat some of those medical conditions before they become bigger problems.

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